Canine Oily Massage

Posted By Dr. Kim on Dec 15, 2017 in Dog Behavior and Nature, Dr. Kim's Views, Essential Oils, Joint & Muscle Support, King's Views, Natural Modalities for Dogs | 2 comments


Dogs lying nose to nose

King and Schatzie lying nose-to-nose after weekly oily massage

King does this every time when Schatzie is getting her weekly Oily massage. He gets his first because he runs and gets on the towel first lol – he LOVES his massages! He moans and sighs all during it. Schatzie just totally relaxes and goes to sleep. At first neither were sure about these massages.

We had King four months before Schatzie so by then he was used to receiving them from me and has grown to really enjoy them. Schatzie on the other hand was so stiff whenever I would handle her initially. She apparently hadn’t been handled much. She was a much neglected dog who didn’t receive much if any attention – not in grooming, interaction, training, etc. She wasn’t afraid, just not used to so much human handling. Plus massage is a very personal, intimate form of touch. It gets to the core of us and them. So she had to learn to trust me in every respect before she could really enjoy the massage as she does now.

Also, Schatzie had a lot of toxicity in her body – it’s what made me think she wasn’t going to last long but I’m really glad I was wrong about that part. This meant the essential oils (we use only Young Living) were going to begin to draw out the toxins and raise her vibrational frequencies. This also mean that the various scents of the oils were repulsive to her as well. King had neither issue and he still doesn’t, although because he has an overactive immune system (sigh, he was conventionally reared prior to us and from a line of conventionally reared dogs – think EPIGENETICS), I use the oils lightly as well on him. The oils are SO amazing because a little for them both goes a long way.

Dogs nose to nose for massage

King and Schatzie nose-to-nose during massage

Because King goes for his massage first as I said at the beginning of this post, I usually use a drop each of whatever oil or oils I am using on him. He likes a deep, thorough massage.

Once in a while Schatzie will go first because King has decided to go outside and sunbathe, one of his favorite things to do – I’ll share why on that in a future post because it’s not for the Vitamin D like we humans receive (and need) through our skin.

Nowadays Schatzie will come lie down when it’s her turn and go to sleep. She even stretches out her hind legs as I massage them, and gets into this whole process. Through patience, consistency and gentleness they have both come to really enjoy this weekly time we spend together. I play real soothing piano music by a guy named DappyKeys on YouTube. As soon as I turn on the music, the one being massaged relaxes – they know the goodness coming their way!

Keep in mind I am not a canine massage therapist. I have watched videos, read and learned, as well as received my own massages so I go based on that. I only do these massage on my own dogs – I don’t massage others dogs.

I just wanted to share with you one of our favorite times together each week and how this is part of my whole health approach to the care of my dogs.

Super cool in my shades!

Lastly, King has a holiday message for all of you before we close and this is SO very much who he is and what he is about:

Paw-lease humans, remain chill for the holidays. No stress okay? It’s not about all the buying yo! Tt’s a season to celebrate the Love that came down. 💖

So be well and be relaxed!

Until next time….

Have a pawsitively tail waggin’, NATUROPATHICALLY healthy day! WOOF!

Kim Bloomer, V.N.D., N.D. is an animal naturopath as well as being certified in small animal nutrition, with years of experience in animal wellness. Dr. Kim is a published author, writer, blogger, host of the Animal Talk Naturally podcast. Copyright 2018 Aspenbloom Pet Care, Dr. Kim Bloomer, All rights reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced in any form without the written consent of the Author/Publisher. This article is intended to be educational. However, it is not intended to be a substitute for diagnosis or treatment from a qualified animal health professional. Dr. Kim Bloomer and Aspenbloom Pet Care, do not assume any legal responsibility for misuse of the products discussed in this article.